10 Simple Basic Table Skirting Design for Beginners


Table skirting has been an essential part of special events. It is an art of covering a table with cloth and other appropriate decorative materials with a purpose of hiding the legs of the table and concealing the things below the table.

Table skirting designs or sometimes referred as table skirting style varies depending upon the availability of cloth length and skills of the table skirter. It could be a simple single pleats, combinations of different kinds of pleats or more complicated designs.


In this post, we are going to show you the basic table skirting styles which you can use if you are still a beginner; this is best for HRM students and neophyte decorators. 

The instructional video is available at the end part of this post.

Single Pleats

This is the most basic of them all. In you would watch our instructional video, you could see that all our design started from these very simple pleats. You can use you palm to measure the width of the first pleat and follow the same measurement with the proceeding folds.

On the photos, the style that you can see on the corners of the table is called accordion pleats. It is done by making several single pleats forming like an accordion.

Knife Pleats

Knife pleats is a single pleats which tips of each pleat is fastened following the same direction. It looks like a pile of knife that is why it is called knife pleats. This style is quite unattractive if it is not combined with other designs. You need to add some ruffles or scallop into it to break the monotony.
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Box Pleats

This is the pleats which two parallel folds are facing opposite directions and it looks like a quadrilateral. Both end of each fold could be fasten or loose, which only the middle part of the pleats are pinned. And just like other types of pleats, there is no standard width in making box pleats.

The example in the picture above is a combination of box pleats and hammock style, which is done by simply pulling the bottom part of the cloth and and pinning them into the upper part of the same cloth. And another style which is applied on the box pleats on the picture above is the scallop, which is done making zigzag fold from the bottom edge of the cloth and pinning them middle of the drape.

Arrow Pleats

This is loose box pleats which has folds on the top portion forming like an arrow. The simplicity and easy-to-do factor of this style makes it more appropriate for rush hours, and this could be an alternative to single pleats style if you want a classic table skirting and you are in hurry. 

Pinch Pleats

It is also known as French pleats. You can commonly see this style in traditional curtains and it is applied as secondary design after other basic pleats like box pleats and accordion pleats are done. Pinch pleats are also difficult to apply on knife pleats because the crease of the table cloth goes in one direction.

Diamond Pleats

This is another secondary design which is usually applied on box pleats and accordion pleats. It is created by pinching the crease of two adjacent pleats alternately to form a diamond pattern. You can create a single line diamond pleats and you can also make multiple layers of it to make the design more appealing, but take note that you would also need a lot of pins in making more diamond patterns.

Rose Pleats

Just like pinch pleats and diamond pleats, rose pleats is also a secondary design which can be applied after other simple basic pleats (box, accordion, knife, and arrow) are created. This is done by making much number of zigzag folds and congesting them in one point closer to each other for form like full bloom rose flowers.

Below is the video which demonstrates how to make the above listed basic table skirting designs. If your find this post helpful, please don't forget to comment, share and subscribe to our YouTube channel. You may also follow us on Facebook and Instagram. 





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